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Cognitive Behavioural Therapy


 

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is an effective form of psychotherapy for many psychological issues, including depression and anxiety. Studies show that CBT is as effective as medication in treating depression, but those who have received CBT are less likely to experience a relapse in the future. Clients are able to call upon the skills learned in session, and will know how to cope with everyday challenges and future emotional difficulties.

CBT works with the assumption that it is our thoughts, and not external sources, which dictate our emotions and behaviour. The benefit of this viewpoint is that we can change the way we think and react, even if external factors (work, family, relationships) do not change.

Techniques may include, but are not limited to:

Cognitive Restructuring

Clients learn to identify, challenge and replace negative thought patterns. The client may record their thoughts in a journal, and evaluate these negative thoughts with the therapist in session.

Behaviour Activation

Depressed and anxious individuals tend to withdraw from activities and social situations, due to feelings of nervousness, worthlessness, lack of interest, and feeling self-conscious. Behaviour Activation is a process in which the therapist encourages participation in an activity or social gathering as a homework exercise. The client may be encouraged to monitor their emotions while participating in the activity, to discuss later in session.

CBT is a commonly practiced therapeutic modality, and many of the Dalton Associates are trained to offer this approach. Contact 1.888.245.5516 to connect with a therapist today.

References:

DeRubeis RJ, et al. (2005). Cognitive therapy vs medications in the treatment of moderate to severe depression. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 62(4):409-16. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15809408

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. (2012). Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy: An Information Guide. http://www.camh.ca/en/education/about/camh_publications/Pages/CBT_Infoguide.aspx.


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